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Direct Research Journals
Direct Research Journal of Agriculture and Food Science:Vol.5 (12), pp. 427-432, December 2017
ISSN 2354-4147

Determination of heavy metals in some selected vegetables cultivated in Sabon Tasha Yola, Adamawa State
Article Number: DRJA133612079
DOI: https://doi.org/10.26765/DRJAFS.2017.2079

Original Research Article


S. Sarkiyayi and F. M. Samaila


Department of Biochemistry, Modibbo Adama University of Technology, Yola, Nigeria.

* Corresponding author E-mail: sarkiyayi_shehu@yahoo.com.


date Received: November 20, 2017     date Accepted: December 10, 2017     date Published: December 26, 2017

Abstract

Dietary exposure to heavy metals such as lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu) etc has been identified as a risk to human health through the consumption of vegetables. This study investigated the concentration of heavy metals in three varities of vegetable samples cultivated in Sabon tasha Yola south of Adamawa state using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). The study showed that the concentration of copper in Hibiscus sabdariffa, Letuca sativa and Amaranthus caudatus were 0.021±0.003 mg/kg, 0.008±0.002mg/kg and 0.010±0.002mg/kg respectively. The concentration of cadmium in Hibiscus sabdariffa and Letuca sativa were 0.006±0.001mg/kg, 0.005±0.004mg/kg respectively and cadmium was not detected in Amaranthus caudatus. The concentration of zinc in Hibiscus sabdariffa, Letuca sativa and Amaranthus caudatus were 0.039±0.004mg/kg, 0.184±0.002mg/kg and 0.067±0.002mg/kg respectively. The concentration of iron in Hibiscus sabdariffa, Letuca sativa and Amaranthus caudatus were 0.353±0.003 mg/kg, 0.265±0.001 mg/kg and 0.071±0.001 mg/kg respectively. The concentration of nickel in Hibiscus sabdariffa and Letuca sativa were 0.006±0.001 mg/kg and 0.004±0.001 mg/kg but was not detected in Amaranthus caudatus. The concentration of lead in Hibiscus sabdariffa was 0.018±0.004 mg/kg but was not detected in both Letuca sativa and Amaranthus caudatus. From this study, the concentrations of heavy metals in all the samples were within the recommended standard of WHO/FAO and are therefore relatively safe for human consumption.


Key words: Hibiscus sabdariffa, letuca sativa, amaranthus caudatus heavy metals and vegetables